COVID 19 Update

The government has issued guidance on access to greenspaces

Exercise is important for health and wellbeing, but please follow guidance to stay safe and protect others.
Gatherings of more than two in parks or other public spaces have been banned and the police will enforce this
Find out more

Advice on use of public rights of way in England is:

  • Stay local and use open spaces near to your home where possible – do not travel unnecessarily.
  • You should only go outside alone or with members of your own household.
  • Keep at least 2 metres apart from anyone outside your household at all times.
  • Take hygiene precautions when you are outside, and wash your hands as soon as you are back indoors.
  • Frequently clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are touched regularly.
  • Follow the Countryside Code. Leave no trace of your visit and take your litter home. Keep dogs under effective control and leave gates as you find them or follow instructions on signs.
  • Respect other people and protect the natural environment. Remember your actions can affect people’s lives and livelihoods.

Stay at home. Save Lives   www.gov.uk/coronavirus

Trail Itineraries

Please just use these for inspiration for the future. Current restrictions mean that you are not able to travel to enjoy the National Trails.

The England Coast Path - South East

Click the play button to see the highlights of The England Coast Path - South East

Trail Information

Find useful facts and learn more about the England Coast Path in the South East below. Select the blue tabs below for more details.

About the Trail

The England Coast Path is a new walking route that will follow the entire coast of England. For the first time people will have the right of access around all our open coast. This includes – where appropriate – any land, other than the trail itself, which forms part of the Coastal Margin. The path is being opened in sections but will, when completed, be the longest coastal path in the world. It will be a National Trail.

At the moment you can only walk some sections. The open sections are shown on the interactive map. As new sections open they will be added to the website maps. You can also see open sections and find out about progress on other sections on the gov.uk website.

In the South East, the following sections are open to the public (as of July 2019):

  • Camber to Folkestone
  • Folkestone to Ramsgate
  • Hopton-on-Sea to Sea Palling
  • Sea Palling to Weybourne

Exploring the Trail

The England Coast Path has been created under new legislation. In parts it follows existing public rights of way, but many sections are completely new and use a new right of access. Because of this it has different rules to public rights of way. Please make sure you obey any on-site signage.

In most places you don’t have to stick to the path. Land to the seaward side of the trail, shaded pink on Ordnance Survey Maps is Coastal Margin. Much of this land has public access. Although you have the right to explore away from the path please use common sense – the England Coast Path includes land that is steep, unstable and not readily accessible. Just because the maps says you can go there doesn’t mean it is safe to do so.

What is special about the Trail?

The England Coast will be the longest coastal walking route in the world when it is complete.

The England Coast Path is much more than just a path. It has been created under new legislation. It allows access to the coast including the cliff tops and the beach. Everything to the seaward side of the path is designated as Coastal Margin. This gives you the right to walk off the path. You can see where this land is – it is shaded pink on the 1:25,000 Ordnance Survey maps.

But, although the land is shaded pink, you don’t have the right to walk everywhere – the Coastal Margin includes land:

  • where access rights don’t apply, for example cropped land, buildings and their curtilage (the land immediately surrounding them), and gardens. This land is called ‘excepted land’. You don’t have the right to walk on excepted land. You can see a full list of excepted land here.
  • that is subject to local restrictions including many areas of saltmarsh and mud flats that are not suitable for public access.
  • that is steep, unstable and not readily accessible.

How does the England Coast Path relate to other National Trails?

In some places the existing National Trail, or part of it, will become part of the England Coast Path as well, for example the South West Coast Path, Norfolk Coast Path and the coastal part of the Cleveland Way. In this case you will see signs on the ground for the existing Trail, but also some ‘part of the England Coast Path’ signs.

There are benefits to the existing National Trails becoming part of the England Coast Path as it makes it much quicker for the Trail managers to resolve any problems due to erosion. It also means that you are able to walk in the Coastal Margin.

You might find in some places the line of the existing National Trail is different to the line of the England Coast Path – in that case you can choose which one to take.

History, heritage and hidden gems

Discover something new to explore every step of the way, from natural icons and historic attractions to coastal towns and villages…

Create your own trip

Feeling inspired? Build a bespoke itinerary and start planning your visit to this great National Trail here.