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              Trail Information

              Find useful facts and learn more about Pembrokeshire Coast Path below.

              About the Trail

              The Pembrokeshire Coast Path twists and turns its way for 186 miles (299 km) along the most breathtaking coastline in Britain. It covers almost every kind of maritime landscape from rugged cliff tops and sheltered coves to wide-open beaches and winding estuaries.

              Lying almost entirely within the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park — Britain’s only truly coastal National Park – the trail displays an array of coastal flowers and bird life, as well as evidence of human activity from Neolithic times to the present.

              In its entirety the Coast Path represents a formidable physical challenge – its 35,000 feet of ascent and descent is said to be equivalent to climbing Everest — yet it can also be enjoyed in shorter sections, accessible to people of all ages and abilities, with the small coastal villages strung out along its length offering welcome breaks and added enjoyment.

              Exploring the Trail

              In its entirety the Coast Path represents a formidable physical challenge – its 35,000 feet of ascent and descent is said to be equivalent to climbing Everest — yet it can also be enjoyed in shorter sections, accessible to people of all ages and abilities, with the small coastal villages strung out along its length offering welcome breaks and added enjoyment.

              The National Trail is very well way-marked so following the route is easy. But it is always a good idea to take a guidebook or map.

              The Pembrokeshire Coast Path has something to offer all the year round and many people prefer to walk when it’s cooler in spring or autumn, or even on exhilarating winter days. The best time depends very much on you, your interests and whether you enjoy the busy holiday season or would prefer to come during the quieter months. In summer it can be difficult to find accommodation especially for single nights, so you are advised to book well in advance.

              Spring is best for seeing migrating and breeding birds and wild flowers. Autumn is good for migrating birds, and seeing seal pups.

              What is special about the Trail?

              The Pembrokeshire Coast Path was the first National Trail in Wales – opened in 1970.

              As well as offering walkers spectacular coastal scenery and wildlife, the Trail passes through a landscape rich in the history of human occupation and maritime history. Walking the Trail reveals Neolithic cromlechs, Iron Age promontory forts, churches and chapels of the seafaring early Celtic saints and their followers, links with the Vikings through place names such as Goodwick and the islands of Skomer and Skokholm, massive Normal castles such as those at Pembroke, Tenby and Manorbier and later Napoleonic forts along the south coast and the Milford Haven waterway.

              Throughout the length of the Trail small quays, lime kilns and warehouses, and sites like the brickworks at Porthgain, are reminders of a industrial tradition. The Milford Haven waterway, whose natural harbour once so impressed Nelson, is still an industrial hub.

              But it is in the quieter, remote and wild places peopled largely by birds and visited occasionally by grey seals, that the spell of old Pembrokeshire – the ancient ‘Land of Mystery and Enchantment’ (Gwlad Hud a Lledrith) remains.

              Getting there

              By plane

              Cardiff Airport is the closest to the Trail. Flybe, KLM, Qatar Airways and Ryanair are amongst the airlines operating regular scheduled, charter flights, domestic and international flights to and from Cardiff.

              By train

              To Amroth (the south end of the Trail) take a train to Kilgetty and then catch the 351 bus to Amroth (5km).

              To St Dogmaels (the north end of the Trail) get a train to Haverfordwest then the 412 bus to Cardigan. Then take the 405 walker bus (Poppit Rocket) or walk to St Dogmaels 2.5km. The 405 also goes to Poppit – another 2km of road walking (no pavement).

              Trains on the west spur meet the National Trail at Fishguard Harbour (Goodwick); on the west spur at Milford Haven; on the south spur at Pembroke Dock and at Tenby.

              For detailed rail information please see www.nationalrail.co.uk

              You can also find public transport information and help with journey planning on the Traveline Cymru website or by calling 0871 200 22 33.

              By bus

              There are National Express bus services from London and Birmingham.

              Pembrokeshire has a fleet of five coastal bus services that run 7 days a week throughout the summer. The buses cover most of the 186 miles of Coast Path National Trail

              • The ‘Poppit Rocket’ follows the coastline between Fishguard and Cardigan, stopping at Pwllgwaelod, Dinas Cross, Newport, Moylegrove, Poppit Sands, and St Dogmaels.
              • The ‘Strumble Shuttle’ runs between Fishguard and St Davids, stopping at Goodwick, Pontiago, Strumble Head, Trefasser Cross, St Nicholas, Tregwynt, Mathry, Abercastle, Trefin, Llanrhian, Porthgain, Abereiddi and St Davids.
              • The ‘Puffin Shuttle’ travels along the coast between St Davids and Milford Haven, passing through Solva, Newgale, Broad Haven, Little Haven, Marloes, Dale, St Ishmaels and Herbrandston.
              • The ‘Coastal Cruiser’ takes passengers around the Angle Peninsula, stopping at Pembroke Dock to Pembroke, Angle, Bosherston and Stackpole.
              • The ‘Celtic Coaster’ runs between St Davids, Porth Clais, St Justinians and Whitesands.

              To find out more about these services visit Pembrokeshire County Council’s website.

              You can also find public transport information and help with journey planning on the Traveline Cymru website or by calling 0871 200 22 33.

              By car

              South-west Wales is linked directly to London and other areas of the UK by the M4 motorway.

              Accommodation

              This National Trail passes through the very best landscapes – places you may want to explore for several days at a time. From cosy country inns to characterful cottages, we’ve got your accommodation near the Pembrokeshire Coast Path covered.

              Ready to plan your walk?

              The National Trails shop has everything you need to plan your trip.